Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis of the knee involves prolonged mechanical breakdown and loss of the smooth articular cartilage layers of the knee joint. These changes are progressive and typically worsen over time. Typical symptoms include persistent pain, and stiffness, catching or grinding, decreased range of motion, and swelling in the knee.
Osteoarthritis Comparison
Osteoarthritis of the knee involves prolonged mechanical breakdown and loss of the smooth articular cartilage layers of the knee joint. These changes are progressive and typically worsen over time. Typical symptoms include persistent pain, and stiffness, catching or grinding, decreased range of motion, and swelling in the knee.
Arthritis X-ray Front Comparison
Osteoarthritis of the knee involves prolonged mechanical breakdown and loss of the smooth articular cartilage layers of the knee joint. These changes are progressive and typically worsen over time. Typical symptoms include persistent pain, and stiffness, catching or grinding, decreased range of motion, and swelling in the knee.
Arthritis X-ray Top Comparison
Osteoarthritis of the knee involves prolonged mechanical breakdown and loss of the smooth articular cartilage layers of the knee joint. These changes are progressive and typically worsen over time. Typical symptoms include persistent pain, and stiffness, catching or grinding, decreased range of motion, and swelling in the knee.
Arthritis X-ray Side Comparison

Overview

This condition involves deterioration of the articular cartilage of the knee. The most common cause of osteoarthritis (OA) is prolonged mechanical breakdown and loss of the smooth articular cartilage layers of your knee joint. These changes are progressive and typically worsen over time.

Articular Cartilage has no blood supply, and virtually no healing properties. Excessive impact, shear stress, or long term wear-and-tear creates cracking, ulceration, and eventually erosion of cartilage down to the underlying bone. When bone is exposed, increased pain is often noted. High friction results in inflammation and bone spur development. Lower leg deformities, such as becoming knock-kneed, or bow-legged, may occur.   

Diagnosis

X-Rays are essential in the diagnosis of OA. Bone spurs, loose pieces, and loss of space between the bones all indicate that the articular cartilage has been lost. MRI scans may be helpful, but are not essential, unless your physician suspects loose pieces that may require surgery, which would not otherwise be performed.  

Symptoms

Typical symptoms include persistent pain, and stiffness, catching or grinding, decreased range of motion, and swelling in the knee. These symptoms limit your walking distance and alter your activity level as well as your general health.

 

Treatments:

Amniotic Fluid Injection

Evolution Total Knee Arthroplasty

Evolution Total Knee Arthroplasty (MP Cementless)

Evolution Total Knee Arthroplasty (PS)

Evolution Total Knee Arthroplasty (MP)

Amniotic Fluid Injection

Regenerative Medicine Treatment Options (Coastal Orthopedics)

Adipose Tissue Stem Cell Injection

Platelet Rich Plasma Injection (PRP)

Platelet Rich Plasma Injection (PRP)

Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Injection

Regenerative Injection

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injection

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injection

Patellofemoral Arthroplasty

High Tibial Osteotomy

Platelet Rich Plasma Injections

Injections (Corticosteroid)

Injections (Corticosteroid)

Glucosamine Injections

Injections (Hyaluronic)

Injections (Hyaluronic)

Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty

Physical Therapy

Lifestyle Modification

Medications

Total Knee Arthroplasty (Navio)

Total Knee Arthroplasty