Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release

Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release

Surgical Treatment

Carpal tunnel release is one of the most common surgical procedures in the United States. Generally recommended if symptoms last for 6 months, surgery involves severing the band of tissue around the wrist to reduce pressure on the median nerve. Surgery is done under local anesthesia and does not require an overnight hospital stay. Many patients require surgery on both hands. The following are types of carpal tunnel release surgery:

Open release surgery, the traditional procedure used to correct carpal tunnel syndrome, consists of making an incision up to 2 inches in the wrist and then cutting the carpal ligament to enlarge the carpal tunnel. The procedure is generally done under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis, unless there are unusual medical considerations.

Endoscopic surgery may allow faster functional recovery and less postoperative discomfort than traditional open release surgery. The surgeon makes two incisions (about ½ inch each) in the wrist and palm, inserts a camera attached to a tube, observes the tissue on a screen, and cuts the carpal ligament (the tissue that holds joints together). This two-portal endoscopic surgery, generally performed under local anesthesia, is effective and minimizes scarring and scar tenderness, if any. Single portal endoscopic surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome is also available and can result in less post-operative pain and a minimal scar.  It generally allows individuals to resume some normal activities in a short period of time.

Although symptoms may be relieved immediately after surgery, full recovery from carpal tunnel surgery can take months. Some patients may have infection, nerve damage, stiffness, and pain at the scar. Occasionally the wrist loses strength because the carpal ligament is cut. Patients should undergo physical therapy after surgery to restore wrist strength. Some patients may need to adjust job duties or even change jobs after recovery from surgery.

Recovery

Sutures are removed in ten to fourteen days post-op. Most patients have returned to most normal, routine tasks by three to four weeks, but laborers may take up to six to eight weeks to return to aggressive use of their hands.

Outcomes

The majority of patients make a full recovery from CTS and the rate of recurrence is very low. Symptoms will usually resolve immediately following surgery, but a full recovery and return to normal activity could take months.

Other treatments:

Regenerative Medicine Treatment Options (Coastal Orthopedics)

Amniotic Fluid Injection

Amniotic Fluid Injection

Platelet Rich Plasma Injection (PRP)

Platelet Rich Plasma Injection (PRP)

Regenerative Injection

Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Injection

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injection

Bone Marrow Stem Cell Injection

Adipose Tissue Stem Cell Injection

Immobilization with Splint

Immobilization with Physical Therapy

Injections (Corticosteroid)

Injections (Corticosteroid)

Mini-open Repair

Open Carpal Tunnel Release

Medications