Stress Fracture

Stress Fracture
A stress fracture occurs from repetitive stress that exceeds the body’s ability to heal and remodel. They usually occur in the metatarsals, but can also affect the other bones of the foot. The injury is common in someone who has recently increased their level of activity but may also be caused by a deformity that puts pressure on the area. Pain and swelling focused to injured area are common symptoms.
Locations Of Stress Fractures Comparison
A stress fracture occurs from repetitive stress that exceeds the body’s ability to heal and remodel. They usually occur in the metatarsals, but can also affect the other bones of the foot. The injury is common in someone who has recently increased their level of activity but may also be caused by a deformity that puts pressure on the area. Pain and swelling focused to injured area are common symptoms.
MRI of Fracture
A stress fracture occurs from repetitive stress that exceeds the body’s ability to heal and remodel. They usually occur in the metatarsals, but can also affect the other bones of the foot. The injury is common in someone who has recently increased their level of activity but may also be caused by a deformity that puts pressure on the area. Pain and swelling focused to injured area are common symptoms.
X-ray of Fracture
A stress fracture occurs from repetitive stress that exceeds the body’s ability to heal and remodel. They usually occur in the metatarsals, but can also affect the other bones of the foot. The injury is common in someone who has recently increased their level of activity but may also be caused by a deformity that puts pressure on the area. Pain and swelling focused to injured area are common symptoms.
MRI of Fracture

Overview

Stress fractures and stress reactions occur in the bones of the foot in several groups: athletes, the elderly, diabetics with neuropathy, and individuals with foot deformity. A stress fracture occurs from repetitive stress that exceeds the body’s ability to heal and remodel. They occur most commonly in the metatarsals (mostly second, third, and fifth), but also occur occasionally in the navicular, calcaneus, and sesamoid bones (beneath the ball of the foot at the great toe). A stress reaction is similar to a fracture but usually isn't visible on plain x-rays.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made by history of pain and swelling of the foot without a known specific trauma. Pain and swelling are usually focused to the area of the injury. The person has typically increased their level of activity a few weeks prior to the injury. They may also have a foot deformity that puts extra pressure on the area of injury. X-rays are often normal in the first two to three weeks, but later show calcium or "callus" around the area of injury. An MRI scan can be helpful if the diagnosis is unclear.

Symptoms

Symptoms of stress fractures are pain and swelling focused in the area of injury. Patients usually limp but are able to put some weight down.

Prevention

Add diversity of exercise and low impact activities to reduce the risk of repeatedly stressing the same part of your foot. Maintaining a healthy weight can ensure the pressure on the foot is not too strenuous. Maintain a diet that is rich in vitamin D and calcium.

Treatments:

Orthosis

Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy

Immobilization

Open Reduction with Internal Fixation

Medications